Cross-dressing All The Way To The Top: Where All The Transvestites Have Gone.

A quick note on pronouns: I don’t give a shit. 

In September this year, the Financial Times and HERoes presented their ‘Top 50 Female Champions of Women in Business’. As explained on the Out-Standing.org website, this list is important because:

Our boardrooms are lacking in gender diversity, and the absence of female representation has an impact at all levels of an organisation. The presence of strong, female role models across all sectors and industries is essential to develop a pool of diverse rising talent.

  • Women still earn 18% less than their male colleagues
  • There are still only seven female CEOs in the FTSE 100
  • Men are still 40% more likely to be promoted to senior management roles, over their female colleagues

The conflation of sex and gender aside, this sounds progressive and worthy. The ‘Top 50 Female’ list is therefore to:

(Recognise) the top 50 senior female role models paving the way for gender diversity at all levels. Nominees will be successful, female executives based in the UK and Ireland, working up to three steps from the CEO.

So far, so good. Yet at number 21, is our old friend Phillip ‘Pippa/Pips’ Bunce, who is “Head of Global Markets Technology Core Engineering Integrations Components” at Credit Suisse. You may remember ‘Pips’ from my piece ‘Drop The T and the Great LGBT Sell-Out’ where I commented:

I wish he would connect his own ‘gender fluidity’ to sexism, or even meaningfully address the structural sexism his own activism literally skirts around but again, this is just another missed opportunity which turns the potentially revolutionary into the properly reactionary.

In case you need reminding,

Pips identifies as gender fluid spending half her time as Phil and the other half as Pippa both at work and at home with her wife and children

What this actually means is described in ‘Mx matters as much as Lord, Prof, Ms and Mr‘ published by the Financial Times, where Bunce writes:

I like to be Phil one day and Pippa another, using different forms of dress and make-up to do so… I am straight… married for more than 20 years and have two children.

The citation given to Bunce is quite staggering, itself meriting its own dissectiom.

Pips took the conscious decision to be ‘out’ at work as gender fluid to embrace and advocate the importance of authenticity as well as to shine a light on the power and diversity of women in the workplace.

How does a man wearing hosiery, a dress, stripper wig and high heels ‘shine a light on the power and diversity of women in the workplace’? Rhetorical question: it does absolutely fuck all. It reduces being a woman in the workplace to the artificial construction of sex-based clothing, which itself is oppressive. I mean, seriously: if he is going to be a champion for women, he actually has to be a champion for women. Instead, he is rigidly reinforcing the very stereotypes women have fought against for centuries and reducing what it means to be a woman to a pantomime costume.

Multiple aspects of our identity, including gender identity/expression, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, disability and religion influence our experiences at work.

What is always interesting in transgender activism is the way that the nebulous and subjective thoughts and feelings of ‘gender identity’ (read: identification with sexist stereotypes) is leveraged and turbo-charged by equalising it to race, sexual orientation and disability. The material reality is rather different: racism still exists, homophobic attacks still happen and disabled people still struggle to find suitable places to go for a pee. And nobody anywhere has a non-circular definition of the subjective thoughts and feelings of ‘gender identity’.

But of course Bunce doesn’t give a fuck, because ethnic minorities, homosexuals and those of us with disabilities are the human shield that allows an economically advantaged, physically healthy straight white man to come into work wearing a dress and claim to be an oppressed minority, to be ‘a woman’ on those days and be the cuckoo in the nest which is supposed to be incubating, nurturing and inspiring a generation of female business leaders. What chance do these women have against the cross-dressing chameleon, the truculent transvestite, who appears happy to not only appropriate ‘woman’ but usurp ‘female’? What kind of intellectual idiocy allowed Financial Times and HERoes to fall for this transgender Trojan horse? Why is he one of forty nine women and not one of thirty men?

Our sex or gender may be the same, but our identities, our successes and our struggles are different and it is for this reason why Pips is proud to be a female champion in business.

I mean, seriously, I can’t even.  This is a man, a straight man, who spends much of his life living as a man, claiming to be a ‘proud female in business’. To quote a phrase (thanks, Magdalen Berns), the minds of this lot are so open their brains have fallen out.

She is a member of the European Women’s Network/IT Women’s Council and had many external publications relating to gender equality published.

As we can see, to Bunce ‘gender equality’ means to raze to the ground the rights that women have, as women, so that men like Bunce can have rights, ‘as a woman’. This is not about equality, this is all about power, and it is oh so clear who is wielding the power. How dare this MAN have the audacity to sit on a women’s council in an environment dominated by males.

Additionally, she has been integral in providing reverse mentoring to management board members of the firm and is co-lead of the LGBT & Ally program at Credit Suisse where she places much importance on intersectionality and how the voices of all types of women and our allies need to be heard to drive forward gender equality – our differences make us stronger and diversity should be celebrated, not tolerated.

This sounds like some form of brainwashing, ‘reverse mentoring’…? Was there a law suit at the end of this? The invocation of intersectionality is another canard, a collectivist argument for crass, uncaring and utterly selfish neoliberal individualism. It cheapens the struggle of ethnic minorities and homosexuals and disabled people to equate their real struggle under oppression to the internalised battle of a man who wants to wear a dress to work.

Pips is also a regular panellist/speaker on gender equality, and often interviewed by external publications on the topic.

Again, make no mistake, this is all about power.

So, what does all this mean, apart from that the people at Financial Times and HERoes don’t know their ass from their elbow?

I often have people asking me ‘where did all the transvestites go’? The whole point of the ‘transgender’ movement is to politically homogenise a broad variety of behaviours foundational upon sex-based stereotypes and present this as a normalised, harmless (even vulnerable) minority, and this is done in a way that conceals the sexual imperative of this type of male behaviour.

Bunce likely is what used to be known as a ‘dual role transvestite’. This is a man who cross-dresses in order to relieve his gender dysphoria. Gender dysphoria is, itself, not a discrete condition,  it presents with symptoms of (sometimes sexually) obsessive behaviour and depression. Sexualised appearance to the contrary (as the images show) Bunce has likely left his sexually active cross-dressing phase behind him and is now entering a comfortable ‘middle aged’ relationship with the ‘woman’ that is himself: this is his equilibrium. Anne Lawrence is, as ever, the answer to how this process happens. I would suggest that once his children are out of full time education, give it a couple of years, and Bunce will transition: he will become yet another autogynephilic transsexual.

But this is all beside the point. Whatever the future may hold for Bunce, the reality is that:

  • Bunce is a heterosexual man who picks and chooses how he benefits from his position;
  • His inclusion on this list is at the expense of an actual woman;
  • His advocacy leverages oppressed minorities to his own benefit;
  • His advocacy is actively anti-woman and anti-homosexual; and
  • Women’s and LGB organisations continue to centre heterosexual males.

It does not have to be like this. Bunce talks a lot about authenticity. I wish he had the balls to say:

  • I am an autogynephilic man, a transvestite, and this is okay;
  • I am not ‘a woman’ and I, as a father of two children, am not female;
  • I care about sex equality, and in my advocacy other equalities will follow this;
  • I understand that gender is stereotypes and this damages all of us; and
  • I believe we should all be allowed to wear what we want to work, whatever makes us most comfortable makes us most happy and productive.

This benefits everyone: it benefits the Bunces, those men trapped in that certain time of their life where they need to crystallise their adolescent fantasies, it benefits the women who are not, through institutional power compelled to accept these men as women or even as female, and even better, it gives all of us a world where we can reconnect with reality.

(It is my intention to provide a counter-example to or challenge the claims and statements made by the author/subject and the ideology which created and supports those claims and statements, not to cause the author/subject to receive any harassment or abuse as a result of this piece. Please do not use this as an excuse to harass them. Thank you).

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  1.  Finding the Middle Ground Between Women’s Rights and Transgender Rights | Miranda Yardley

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